Page 63

The “Sixty Exercises of Mechanism” begin on page 63. These are great little technique and coordination builders written in 2 to 4 bar studies. In fact, these have been so successful and popular that Hemie Voxman lifted a bunch of these studies for the “Exercises in Fingerings” section for his “Advanced Method for Saxophone”.
Page 63 includes exercises one through fifteen. They should be treated like the Confucius aphorisms. With Confucius you don’t just read through pages and expect to get the point. You take one or two of his sayings and spend some time thinking about them before you move on. The same is true for the “Exercises of Mechanism”. To get the full benefit, take on just a few at a time, begin with slow repetitions and stay with them until they are easy.
Paul de Ville suggests a similar approach; “play each eight to ten times”. He also suggests that you make a crescendo followed by a decrescendo. In addition I would recommend that, after the slurred version is mastered, apply different articulations. For the hardcore saxophonist some of the studies could be transposed, for example nos. 5, 8 and 9.
Paul de Ville does a great job in targeting some of the problem areas of technique and writing effective studies
Please send your comments regarding your used of these studies or any other ideas regarding the Universal Method.
Thank you,
Neal Ramsay
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Published in: on October 20, 2009 at 8:44 am  Leave a Comment  

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